Tag Archives: urban studies

Sat Mar 30th – The Lost Village

 

 

Saturday, March 30, 2019, 7:00 p.m.
University of Ottawa, Vanier Building room 1095
( 136 Jean-Jacques Lussier Priv, Ottawa, ON)
Please note change of location for this event only.

 

In partnership with UOttawa Critical Urban Studies, Cinema Academica presents

 

The lost village (2018)

 

for our final showing of the 2018-2019 UOttawa school year.

 

mar 30 the lost village
In Greenwich Village there is Debt Slavery and prostitution at NYU due to high tuition and fees for students. NYU and other Land Lords are changing the character of the Bohemian Village due to outrageous rents and passing along of real estate taxes.

1 hr 29 min.


 

 
March 30, 2019 is the final showing of the winter 2019 semester.

Look forward to our return in September 2019 for the Fall 2019 semester.

Watch the webpage (cinemaacademica.ca) or join the email list to see if we plan anything interesting in between these times.

 

 

 

 

Sat Mar 23rd – Citizen Jane

Saturday, March 23, 2019, 7:00 p.m.
University of Ottawa, FSS 1006

Citizen Jane

citizen jane documentary poster pic

It is a timely tale of what can happen when engaged citizens fight the power for the sake of a better world. Arguably, no one did more to shape our understanding of the modern American city than Jane Jacobs, the visionary activist and writer who fought to preserve urban communities in the face of destructive development projects.

93 min.

 

 

Sat Nov 17th – The Pruitt-Igoe Myth

Saturday, November 17, 2018, 7pm Room FSS-1006

The Pruitt-Igoe Myth (2011):

Pruitt-Igoe_Myth,_documentary_poster

Destroyed in a dramatic and highly-publicized implosion, the Pruitt-Igoe public housing complex has become a widespread symbol of failure amongst architects, politicians and policy makers. The Pruitt-Igoe Myth explores the social, economic and legislative issues that led to the decline of conventional public housing in America, and the city centers in which they resided, while tracing the personal and poignant narratives of several of the project’s residents. In the post-War years, the American city changed in ways that made it unrecognizable from a generation earlier, privileging some and leaving others in its wake. The next time the city changes, remember Pruitt-Igoe.