Oliver Stones’ Ukraine On Fire – Jan 27, 2018

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

This week at Cinema Academica:

Saturday, January 27, 2018, 7:00 p.m.

Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa. room 339

Map: http://www.uottawa.ca/maps/

Ukraine on Fire
Ukraine’s 2014 Maidan Massacre helped oust President Yanukovych with Russia painted as the perpetrator. Oliver Stone interviews Russian President Vladimir PutinYanukovych and others, exposing the role the U.S. played in destabilizing the region.

Cinema Academica hosts film screenings during the academic year at the University of Ottawa on various social, political and economic issues in order to increase social consciousness and encourage activism in the community. All films are completely free of charge. All films are followed by discussion.

For more information:cinemaacademica.ca

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/UOttawa-CinemaAcademica/111045945712456

Parking: There is limited metered parking on campus on Séraphin-Marion (the continuation of Wilbrod west of Cumberland) and in the adjacent lot east of Tabaret Hall, and also on Louis Pasteur, between MacDonald Hall and Gendron Hall. The meters are enforced 24/7. There is also a pay-and-display lot beside Simard Hall. The best bet is on nearby streets in Sandy Hill, e.g., Henderson, where there are signs for 2 or 3 hour parking up to 7:00 p.m., unrestricted after 7:00.

jan 20th – (watching) an interview with Gene Sharp

 

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA
This week at Cinema Academica:

Saturday, January 20, 2018, 7:00 p.m.

Vanier Hall, University of Ottawa. room 2095

Please note change of location for this week only!
Map: www.uottawa.ca/maps/

(from the video we will be watching):
Many protest movements around the world have been influenced by an 83-year-old political scientist, Dr Gene Sharp and his book From Dictatorship to Democracy. We are thrilled to announce that Dr Gene Sharp will be joining us at the Frontline Club in conversation with Ruaridh Arrow, journalist, filmmaker and director of the award winning documentary How to Start a Revolution to discuss the uprisings across the Middle East and North Africa and his work. From the ground floor of his home in Boston the 83-year-old runs the Albert Einstein Institution which is devoted to the study and promotion of the use of nonviolent resistance worldwide.

The 198 “non-violent weapons” listed in his book range from the use of colours and symbols, writing large banners in English to mock funerals and boycotts. First written in 1993 to support the opposition movement in Burma, Sharp’s work has now been circulated amongst dissidents around the world.

cinemaacademica.ca/?p=351

 

 

Winter 2018 season starts – Sat. January 13th

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

This week at Cinema Academica:

Saturday, January 13, 2018, 7:00 p.m.

Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa. room 339

Map: http://www.uottawa.ca/maps/

Mental health and drugs—is there a better way?

We will start with a short meeting to discuss film possibilities for the Winter term, so bring ideas. This will be followed by a series of short clips on the topic of mental health and drugs and possible alternatives, followed by discussion. If there is time we may also consider other topics of interest to the group.

 

Fall Cinema Academica showings Nov 18, 25, Dec 2

 

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

This week at Cinema Academica:

Saturday, November 18, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa. room 339

Map: http://www.uottawa.ca/maps/

Exploring the anti-vax movement 

2 hours of anti-vaccination expert clips followed by discussion

 


Upcoming at Cinema Academica (tentative listing):

Saturday, November 25, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa, room 339Social Theory of Freedom of Expression

A Cinema Academica talk by

Dr Denis Rancourt

Researcher, Ontario Civil Liberties Association (ocla.ca)

SUMMARY:

If there is one feature of social organization that speaks to our fundamental human nature, then it is our relentless creation, maintenance and growth of dominance hierarchy.

I will describe civil rights and the fundamental human right of freedom of expression as necessary maintenance and self-repair mechanisms for any large dominance hierarchy (civilization, nation, corporation…) to thrive rather than suffer partial or total collapse.

In this picture, all laws are evolving codes to organize, stabilize and enforce a growing and complexifying dominance hierarchy. Predictably, the codes themselves are often “hacked” by upper-strata groups that are overly ambitious in seeking additional relative advantages. This produces “pathological” laws that destabilize the overall hierarchy. I will argue that present anti-speech laws (internet censorship, correctness codes, civil defamation, secrecy laws, criminal hate speech) are such pathological laws, the degree of application of which is a measure of the degree of totalitarianism in the society.

Saturday, December 2, 2017, 7:00 p.m.
Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa, room 339

What Would Jesus Buy? is a 2007 documentary film produced by Morgan Spurlock and directed by Rob VanAlkemade. The title is a take-off on the phrase “What would Jesus do?“. The film debuted on the festival circuit on March 11, 2007, at the South By Southwest (SXSW) conference in Austin, Texas. It went into general U.S. release on November 16, 2007.

The film follows the exploits of the semi-fictional group Reverend Billy and the Church of Stop Shopping. Although founded as a performance collective rather than an actual religious organization, members of the group express spiritual viewpoints against excessive consumerism and materialism, particularly in the context of Christmas. The aforementioned Reverend Billy, played by social activist Bill Talen, is intended by its non-Christian performer not as parody but as a living example of past radical preachers.

 

trailer   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sGi21YQFjMM

 

full movie   https://vimeo.com/63120451
This will be our last showing for fall 2017. The series resumes January 13, 2018.

 

 

 

 

OCLA’s annual Civil Liberties Award event Fri Oct 27

 

Dear OCLA Supporter,
 
This is a reminder that the OCLA’s annual Civil Liberties Award event will be held this Friday, October 27 at 7:00 p.m. in the main meeting room of the PSAC building (233 Gilmour St., Ottawa).
 
New: For child-caring parents: The talk is adult content using adult language, however a children’s activity will be provided on-site — Barbara Ann Vocisano of Legal Education Consultants will be running a children’s drawing/colouring table at the event.
 
More details about the event are below and at: http://ocla.ca/ocla-civil-liberties-award/
 
Hope to see you there!
Yours truly,
Joseph Hickey
Executive Director
Ontario Civil Liberties Association (OCLA) http://ocla.ca
 
—– Original message —–
From: “Joseph Hickey | OCLA” <joseph.hickey@ocla.ca>
To: Joseph Hickey <joseph.hickey@ocla.ca>
Subject: RELEASE: Jeannette Tossounian to Receive the 2017 OCLA Civil Liberties Award
Date: Mon, 16 Oct 2017 08:28:35 -0400
Jeannette Tossounian to Receive the 2017 OCLA Civil Liberties Award
(Image links to the YouTube video)
(Ottawa, October 16, 2017) — The Ontario Civil Liberties Association (OCLA) will present its 2017 Civil Liberties Award to Jeannette Tossounian at a public event in Ottawa, Ontario, on Friday October 27 (7pm, PSAC building, 233 Gilmour St., Ottawa, Ontario).
Senator Kim Pate, defender of women prisoners’ rights, will introduce the award recipient.
Ms. Tossounian will speak about her work and life experience related to civil rights and liberties, followed by a question-answer and discussion period open to the participating public.
Jeannette Tossounian is a life-long artist, author, and an authentic and dedicated defender of civil rights. She was self-represented and was wrongly convicted in a trial in which the Crown violated its disclosure obligations (see 2017 appeal decision, link here). She spent two years in harsh conditions in an Ontario jail for women. She was put into solitary confinement for defending her prisoner’s civil right not to be forced to wear a bra. Her 2016 book The Human Kennel, which was written in jail, is a compelling and incisive examination of inner and institutional life behind bars. This quote illustrates Ms. Tossounian’s spirit:
“I doubt I’ll make parole, I’m not into submitting to a corrupt unjust system and telling them what a bad person I have been and how much I’ve changed for the better thanks to my incarceration. … I still have my mind and won’t lose what is inside of me.”
Her continued revelations and commentary are helping to reform police and prison practices in the province.
Past recipients of the OCLA Civil Liberties Award were Harry Kopyto (2013), Terri-Jean Bedford (2014), Connie Fournier (2015), and Bruce Allan Clark (2016).
The OCLA thus co-celebrates its five-year anniversary and hopes the free public event will be an occasion for meetings and discussions on these vital issues.
Award page, updated regularly: http://ocla.ca/ocla-civil-liberties-award/
About the OCLA
The OCLA vigorously advocates for authentic and unqualified freedom of expression of individuals, on all topics and in every form, in accordance with the right to free expression enshrined in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The OCLA also advocates for unimpeded civil liberties and civil rights of all persons, in dealings with public and private institutions and corporations.
The OCLA is not affiliated with the Canadian Civil Liberties Association (CCLA) or the British Columbia Civil Liberties Association (BCCLA). All three associations are separate and distinct.
Contact:
Joseph Hickey
Executive Director
Ontario Civil Liberties Association (OCLA) http://ocla.ca