Monthly Archives: October 2017

OCLA’s annual Civil Liberties Award event Fri Oct 27

 

Dear OCLA Supporter,
 
This is a reminder that the OCLA’s annual Civil Liberties Award event will be held this Friday, October 27 at 7:00 p.m. in the main meeting room of the PSAC building (233 Gilmour St., Ottawa).
 
New: For child-caring parents: The talk is adult content using adult language, however a children’s activity will be provided on-site — Barbara Ann Vocisano of Legal Education Consultants will be running a children’s drawing/colouring table at the event.
 
More details about the event are below and at: http://ocla.ca/ocla-civil-liberties-award/
 
Hope to see you there!
Yours truly,
Joseph Hickey
Executive Director
Ontario Civil Liberties Association (OCLA) http://ocla.ca
 
—– Original message —–
From: “Joseph Hickey | OCLA” <joseph.hickey@ocla.ca>
To: Joseph Hickey <joseph.hickey@ocla.ca>
Subject: RELEASE: Jeannette Tossounian to Receive the 2017 OCLA Civil Liberties Award
Date: Mon, 16 Oct 2017 08:28:35 -0400
Jeannette Tossounian to Receive the 2017 OCLA Civil Liberties Award
(Image links to the YouTube video)
(Ottawa, October 16, 2017) — The Ontario Civil Liberties Association (OCLA) will present its 2017 Civil Liberties Award to Jeannette Tossounian at a public event in Ottawa, Ontario, on Friday October 27 (7pm, PSAC building, 233 Gilmour St., Ottawa, Ontario).
Senator Kim Pate, defender of women prisoners’ rights, will introduce the award recipient.
Ms. Tossounian will speak about her work and life experience related to civil rights and liberties, followed by a question-answer and discussion period open to the participating public.
Jeannette Tossounian is a life-long artist, author, and an authentic and dedicated defender of civil rights. She was self-represented and was wrongly convicted in a trial in which the Crown violated its disclosure obligations (see 2017 appeal decision, link here). She spent two years in harsh conditions in an Ontario jail for women. She was put into solitary confinement for defending her prisoner’s civil right not to be forced to wear a bra. Her 2016 book The Human Kennel, which was written in jail, is a compelling and incisive examination of inner and institutional life behind bars. This quote illustrates Ms. Tossounian’s spirit:
“I doubt I’ll make parole, I’m not into submitting to a corrupt unjust system and telling them what a bad person I have been and how much I’ve changed for the better thanks to my incarceration. … I still have my mind and won’t lose what is inside of me.”
Her continued revelations and commentary are helping to reform police and prison practices in the province.
Past recipients of the OCLA Civil Liberties Award were Harry Kopyto (2013), Terri-Jean Bedford (2014), Connie Fournier (2015), and Bruce Allan Clark (2016).
The OCLA thus co-celebrates its five-year anniversary and hopes the free public event will be an occasion for meetings and discussions on these vital issues.
Award page, updated regularly: http://ocla.ca/ocla-civil-liberties-award/
About the OCLA
The OCLA vigorously advocates for authentic and unqualified freedom of expression of individuals, on all topics and in every form, in accordance with the right to free expression enshrined in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The OCLA also advocates for unimpeded civil liberties and civil rights of all persons, in dealings with public and private institutions and corporations.
The OCLA is not affiliated with the Canadian Civil Liberties Association (CCLA) or the British Columbia Civil Liberties Association (BCCLA). All three associations are separate and distinct.
Contact:
Joseph Hickey
Executive Director
Ontario Civil Liberties Association (OCLA) http://ocla.ca

 

 

Fall 2017 Upcoming Cinema Academica Shows

 

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

This week at Cinema Academica:

Saturday, October 28, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa, room 339

Map: http://www.uottawa.ca/maps/Empire files: Propaganda & Engineering Consent for Empire with Mark Crispin Miller
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F7HmFH-Wo1s

With thousands of advertisements seen by Americans everyday, and a corporate media that reinforces the needs of Empire, propaganda in the U.S. is more pervasive and effective than ever before. The manipulation of public opinion through suggestion can be traced back to the father of modern propaganda, Edward Bernays, who discovered that preying on the subconscious mind was the best way to sell products people don’t need, and wars people don’t want. To get a deeper understanding of how propaganda functions in today’s society, Abby Martin interviews Dr. Mark Crispin Miller, professor of Media Studies at New York University.

AND

Peter Joseph’s Culture in Decline, episode 1: “What Democracy?” (2012)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTbLslkIR2k

This opening show addresses the (at the time) coming 2012 US Presidential Election and the subject of what we perceive as “Democracy” in the world today. It includes a good explanation of what ‘cognitive dissonance’ is, and how it serves to keep people ignorant and helpless to respond to crises we face today.


Upcoming at Cinema Academica (tentative listing):

Saturday, November 4, 2017, 7:00 p.m.
Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa. room 339

November 7 is the 100th anniversary of the Great October Socialist Revolution in Russia. To mark the occasion we present

Tsar to Lenin
1 hour 3 minutes
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rjcT8ucTmNs

The story of the Russian revolution using real footage from that period.

Saturday, November 11, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

We are currently planning to take a break this week, so there will be no showing.

Saturday, November 18, 2017, 7:00 p.m.
Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa. room 339

Why we fight

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BcuStxJHv4c

Why We Fight won the Grand Jury Prize at the 2005 Sundance Film Festival. It is an unflinching look at the anatomy of the American war machine, weaving unforgettable personal stories with commentary by a “who’s who” of military and Washington beltway insiders. Featuring John McCain, Gore Vidal, William Kristol, Chalmers Johnson, Richard Perle and others, Why We Fight launches a bipartisan inquiry into the workings of the military industrial complex and the rise of the American Empire.
Saturday, November 25, 2017, 7:00 p.m.
Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa, room 339
Social Theory of Freedom of Expression

A Cinema Academica talk by

Dr Denis Rancourt

Researcher, Ontario Civil Liberties Association (ocla.ca)

SUMMARY:

If there is one feature of social organization that speaks to our fundamental human nature, then it is our relentless creation, maintenance and growth of dominance hierarchy.

I will describe civil rights and the fundamental human right of freedom of expression as necessary maintenance and self-repair mechanisms for any large dominance hierarchy (civilization, nation, corporation…) to thrive rather than suffer partial or total collapse.

In this picture, all laws are evolving codes to organize, stabilize and enforce a growing and complexifying dominance hierarchy. Predictably, the codes themselves are often “hacked” by upper-strata groups that are overly ambitious in seeking additional relative advantages. This produces “pathological” laws that destabilize the overall hierarchy. I will argue that present anti-speech laws (internet censorship, correctness codes, civil defamation, secrecy laws, criminal hate speech) are such pathological laws, the degree of application of which is a measure of the degree of totalitarianism in the society.

Friday, December 1 OR Saturday, December 2, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

To be arranged.

This will be our last showing for fall 2017. The series resumes January 13, 2018.

 

 

Cinema Academica Fall 2017 Schedule Oct 14 – Dec 2nd

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

This week at Cinema Academica

Saturday, October 14, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa, room 339

Map: http://www.uottawa.ca/maps/

Empire Files: Privacy, Control, & the Darknet

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Asu3_ataA1M

Out of the periphery of most online users, there’s a vast, hidden space used by people who want to remain anonymous, which filmmaker Alex Winter explores in his documentary Deep Web. The film focuses on the Silk Road, a black market hosted on the Darknet using bitcoin cryptocurrency, and the trial of Ross Ulbricht, who was given a double life sentence without the possibility of parole for creating and hosting the site. Abby Martin and Alex Winter discuss more about the Deep Web, the Drug War, and why encryption on things like signal still matter in light of the Wikileaks’ Vault 7 release.


Upcoming at Cinema Academica (tentative listing):

Saturday, October 21, 2017, 7:00 p.m.
Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa, room 339

Empire files: The Rise of history’s greatest empire

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gs4PxkVUxKs

Abby Martin debuts teleSUR’s The Empire Files exploring the U.S. Empire, its rise to world hegemony and its impact on people and the planet.

Saturday, October 28, 2017
Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa, room 339
Empire files: Propaganda & Engineering Consent for Empire with Mark Crispin Miller
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F7HmFH-Wo1s

With thousands of advertisements seen by Americans everyday, and a corporate media that reinforces the needs of Empire, propaganda in the U.S. is more pervasive and effective than ever before. The manipulation of public opinion through suggestion can be traced back to the father of modern propaganda, Edward Bernays, who discovered that preying on the subconscious mind was the best way to sell products people don’t need, and wars people don’t want. To get a deeper understanding of how propaganda functions in today’s society, Abby Martin interviews Dr. Mark Crispin Miller, professor of Media Studies at New York University.

Saturday, November 4, 2017, 7:00 p.m.
Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa. room 339

Empire Files: Bush Military Official: The Empire’s Ship is Sinking
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zOagQ_nfCes

Abby Martin interviews retired U.S. Army Colonel Lawrence Wilkerson, former national security advisor to the Reagan administration, who spent years as an assistant to Secretary of State Colin Powell during both Bush administrations. Today, he is honest about the unfixable corruption inside the establishment and the corporate interests driving foreign policy. Hear a rare insider’s view of what interests are behind U.S. wars, the manipulation of intelligence, the intertwining of the military and corporate world, and why the U.S. Empire is doomed.

Saturday, November 11, 2017, 7:00 p.m.
Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa. room 339

Why we fight

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BcuStxJHv4c

Why We Fight won the Grand Jury Prize at the 2005 Sundance Film Festival. It is an unflinching look at the anatomy of the American war machine, weaving unforgettable personal stories with commentary by a “who’s who” of military and Washington beltway insiders. Featuring John McCain, Gore Vidal, William Kristol, Chalmers Johnson, Richard Perle and others, Why We Fight launches a bipartisan inquiry into the workings of the military industrial complex and the rise of the American Empire.

Saturday,  November 18, 2017, 7:00 p.m.
Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa. room 339

Michael Moore’s ‘Sicko’

trailer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ffVJshHn-1w

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TcyWMgpDOX4

2h3m 2007

Filmmaker Michael Moore examines America’s health-care crisis and why millions of citizens are without coverage. Moore spotlights the cases of several ordinary citizens whose lives have been shattered by bureaucratic red tape, refusal of payment, and other health-care catastrophes. He explains how the system has become so problematic, and he visits countries where citizens receive free health care, as in Canada, France and the U.K..
Saturday, November 25, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa, room 339
Social Theory of Freedom of Expression

A Cinema Academica talk by

Dr Denis Rancourt

Researcher, Ontario Civil Liberties Association (ocla.ca)

SUMMARY:

If there is one feature of social organization that speaks to our fundamental human nature, then it is our relentless creation, maintenance and growth of dominance hierarchy.

I will describe civil rights and the fundamental human right of freedom of expression as necessary maintenance and self-repair mechanisms for any large dominance hierarchy (civilization, nation, corporation…) to thrive rather than suffer partial or total collapse.

In this picture, all laws are evolving codes to organize, stabilize and enforce a growing and complexifying dominance hierarchy. Predictably, the codes themselves are often “hacked” by upper-strata groups that are overly ambitious in seeking additional relative advantages. This produces “pathological” laws that destabilize the overall hierarchy.

I will argue that present anti-speech laws (internet censorship, correctness codes, civil defamation, secrecy laws, criminal hate speech) are such pathological laws, the degree of application of which is a measure of the degree of totalitarianism in the society.

Saturday, December 2, 2017, 7:00 p.m.
Peter Joseph’s Culture in Decline, episode 1: “What Democracy?” (2012)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTbLslkIR2k

This opening show addresses the (at the time) coming 2012 US Presidential Election and the subject of what we perceive as “Democracy” in the world today. It includes a good explanation of what ‘cognitive dissonance’ is, and how it serves to keep people ignorant and helpless to respond to crises we face today.

This will be our last showing for fall 2017. The series resumes January 13, 2018.