Category Archives: Events

All of the past events

Mar 17 – Call of the Forest

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

Saturday, March 17th, 2018, 7:00 p.m.

Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa. room 339

Map: http://www.uottawa.ca/maps/

[call of the forest mar 17 2018]diana_and_the_tree_

Call of the Forest: The Forgotten Wisdom of Trees

Forests are one of the world’s most significant sources of food, new medicines and oxygen. Scientist and author Diana Beresford-Kroeger explores our profound biological and spiritual connection with trees, and meets people who are taking the lead to replant, restore and protect the last of the planet’s great ancient forests.

52:03

 


Cinema Academica hosts film screenings during the academic year at the University of Ottawa on various social, political and economic issues in order to increase social consciousness and encourage activism in the community. All films are completely free of charge. All films are followed by discussion.

For more information:cinemaacademica.ca

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/UOttawa-CinemaAcademica/111045945712456

Parking: There is limited metered parking on campus on Séraphin-Marion (the continuation of Wilbrod west of Cumberland) and in the adjacent lot east of Tabaret Hall, and also on Louis Pasteur, between MacDonald Hall and Gendron Hall. The meters are enforced 24/7. There is also a pay-and-display lot beside Simard Hall. The best bet is on nearby streets in Sandy Hill, e.g., Henderson, where there are signs for 2 or 3 hour parking up to 7:00 p.m., unrestricted after 7:00.

Mar 10 – IAW Part 2

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

Saturday, March 10th, 2018, 7:00 p.m.

Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa. room 339

Map: http://www.uottawa.ca/maps/

The 14th Annual Israeli Apartheid Week of actions will take place all around the world between February 19th and April 17th 2018. Israeli Apartheid Week (IAW) is an international series of events that seek to raise awareness of Israel’s apartheid system over the Palestinian people and to build support for the growing Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement.

Cinema Academica presents a series of episodes from Abby Martin’s Media Files that focus on the Palestinian question.

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Israeli Apartheid Week, Part 2.

The Distortion & Death Behind Israel/Palestine Coverage // Empire_File009

The Distortion & Death Behind Israel/Palestine Coverage

A crisis in Palestine is again all over the headlines. From stabbings and molotov cocktails, to killing of protesters and anti-Arab lynch mobs—how much of the mass media coverage can we really trust?

Abby Martin takes a look at how the so-called “Israel-Palestine conflict” has been covered by the mainstream press during the last crisis in the region, and the variety of tactics employed by the state of Israel to control the narrative: from it’s Hasbara propaganda machine, to outright killing of journalists.

Featuring interviews with Dan Cohen (@DanCohen3000), investigative journalist who just returned from 7 months of reporting from Gaza and the West Bank, and Rania Khalek (@RaniaKhelek) writer and editor with Electronic Intifada.

25:34

 

Home Demolitions for Illegal Settlements Surging // Empire_File042

Home Demolitions for Illegal Settlements Surging

The demolition of Palestinian homes for Israeli settlements reached a ten-year high in 2016. While this activity led by the fanatical settler movement is illegal under international law, it is completely aided and abetted by the Israeli government.

With hundreds on notice to be evicted and their homes destroyed, Abby Martin goes on-the-ground throughout the West Bank investigating this dire human rights situation. She speaks to residents living under regular settler attacks from encroaching settlements and outposts illegal even under Israeli law, and sees first-hand how this crisis is worsening.

https://videosenglish.telesurtv.net/video/608068/the-empire-files-608068/

24:12

Inside the Hotbeds of Israeli Settler Terror // Empire_File043

Inside the Hotbeds of Israeli Settler Terror

Abby Martin goes on-the-ground to the epicenters of state-backed settler terrorism in Palestine’s West Bank, in Part II of her report on illegal Israeli settlements and home demolitions.

This installment visits both the rural countryside of Duma—interviewing the surviving members of the Dawabsheh family, victims of a horrific arson attack that left three dead—and the urban centre of Hebron, a glaring example of Israeli apartheid under intense military occupation.

26:06

Jewish-American on Israel’s Fascism: “No Hope For Change From Within”

Abby Martin interviews journalist and author Max Blumenthal on the current situation in Palestine and the Israeli occupation. This episode covers what is behind today’s rebellion, the rising dominance of far-right, ultra-racist ideology in Israel, eye-witness accounts of the aftermath of the Gaza war, and the Israeli government’s fear of Palestinian resistance.

Max Blumenthal is an award-winning journalist and New York Times Best Selling author. He has written two books on Palestine, “Goliath: Life and Loathing in Greater Israel,” and the recently-published “The 51 Day War: Ruin and Resistance in Gaza.”

28:09

 


Cinema Academica hosts film screenings during the academic year at the University of Ottawa on various social, political and economic issues in order to increase social consciousness and encourage activism in the community. All films are completely free of charge. All films are followed by discussion.

For more information:cinemaacademica.ca

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/UOttawa-CinemaAcademica/111045945712456

Parking: There is limited metered parking on campus on Séraphin-Marion (the continuation of Wilbrod west of Cumberland) and in the adjacent lot east of Tabaret Hall, and also on Louis Pasteur, between MacDonald Hall and Gendron Hall. The meters are enforced 24/7. There is also a pay-and-display lot beside Simard Hall. The best bet is on nearby streets in Sandy Hill, e.g., Henderson, where there are signs for 2 or 3 hour parking up to 7:00 p.m., unrestricted after 7:00.

Feb 17 – Urban Gentrification and Black History Month

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

Saturday, February 17, 2018, 7:00 p.m.

Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa. room 339

Map: http://www.uottawa.ca/maps/
For Black History Month, Cinema Academica is showing two Urban Studies short documentaries about black communities, and gentrification, or poor and disenfranchised people being pushed out of areas as more monied people and interests take interest in those areas and reshape them to their own vision and needs.

 

Chocolate City (gentrification in Washington, DC) 45min

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In this 45 minute-long documentary film-makers Sam Wild and Ellie Walton address the issue of gentrification of Washington, DC. Through the experiences of a number of largely black residents the film explores how the city is being altered as property prices rise and local communities are forced out of the world’s most famous capital.

Africville (Nova Scotia) 35min

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This short film depicts Africville, a small black settlement that lay within the city limits of Halifax, Nova Scotia. In the 1960s, the families there were uprooted and their homes demolished in the name of urban renewal and integration. More than 20 years later, the site of the community of Africville is a stark, under-utilized park. Former residents, their descendants and some of the decision-makers speak out and, with the help of archival photographs and films, tell the story of that painful relocation.
Director: Shelagh Mackenzie

Map_Halifax_Africville_1920x1080

Cinema Academica hosts film screenings during the academic year at the University of Ottawa on various social, political and economic issues in order to increase social consciousness and encourage activism in the community. All films are completely free of charge. All films are followed by discussion.

For more information:cinemaacademica.ca

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/UOttawa-CinemaAcademica/111045945712456

Parking: There is limited metered parking on campus on Séraphin-Marion (the continuation of Wilbrod west of Cumberland) and in the adjacent lot east of Tabaret Hall, and also on Louis Pasteur, between MacDonald Hall and Gendron Hall. The meters are enforced 24/7. There is also a pay-and-display lot beside Simard Hall. The best bet is on nearby streets in Sandy Hill, e.g., Henderson, where there are signs for 2 or 3 hour parking up to 7:00 p.m., unrestricted after 7:00.

 

 

jan 20th – (watching) an interview with Gene Sharp

 

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA
This week at Cinema Academica:

Saturday, January 20, 2018, 7:00 p.m.

Vanier Hall, University of Ottawa. room 2095

Please note change of location for this week only!
Map: www.uottawa.ca/maps/

(from the video we will be watching):
Many protest movements around the world have been influenced by an 83-year-old political scientist, Dr Gene Sharp and his book From Dictatorship to Democracy. We are thrilled to announce that Dr Gene Sharp will be joining us at the Frontline Club in conversation with Ruaridh Arrow, journalist, filmmaker and director of the award winning documentary How to Start a Revolution to discuss the uprisings across the Middle East and North Africa and his work. From the ground floor of his home in Boston the 83-year-old runs the Albert Einstein Institution which is devoted to the study and promotion of the use of nonviolent resistance worldwide.

The 198 “non-violent weapons” listed in his book range from the use of colours and symbols, writing large banners in English to mock funerals and boycotts. First written in 1993 to support the opposition movement in Burma, Sharp’s work has now been circulated amongst dissidents around the world.

cinemaacademica.ca/?p=351

 

 

Africa and the Single Story

By Joey Clavette

Earlier this semester we screened “Concerning Violence“. I wrote a little something about it here. But before the film I had also given a presentation on Africa which attempted to dispel a lot of myths about it. While this film which is set in Africa is about violence, it is imperative to know that Africa is much more than a land of violence. In an African history course I took I was made to sit down and actually write about this subject so I thought I’d share it here:

Kigali, Rwanda today

The word Africa comes from the Latin word Afri. Originally the name was meant to describe one tribe which the Romans had known from Libya. The term then came to be used to describe the entire expansive and diverse continent. This is an illustrative example from ancient Western culture to show how simplistic the Western view of Africa has been for a very long time.

In his work The Invention of Africa, philosopher V.Y. Mudimbe points out that African unity was not a concept on the continent before European contact. Blackness and Africanness are descriptions of an “Other”; as something different in such a way from Europeanness. Africans are described altogether by their relative difference to Europeans rather than their own characteristics. This results in a vast homogenization of Africans in the Western psyche, and we can clearly see that present today in what Chimamanda Adichie calls the ‘Single Story of Africa’.

One might hear a friend say “I’d like to go to Africa”, and when asked “where in Africa?” they might respond with dismay… “just Africa”. Africa to many people is thought of as a vast, wild (yet relative homogenous) landscape full of violent conflicts, diseases, poverty, safari animals and “black” people. This is how Africa is portrayed in popular media. This is the single story. The fact that there is more genetic diversity among the natives of Africa than there is among white Europeans is not important, they are simply “black”. The vast size of the African continent, the metropolitan areas, the ecological diversity, the more than 1500 unique languages, the stability, the health and the economic development are all glossed over and replaced with a single story.

Continue reading Africa and the Single Story