Category Archives: Uncategorized

Feb 24 – Saving Capitalism

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

Saturday, February 24, 2018, 7:00 p.m.

Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa. room 339

Map: http://www.uottawa.ca/maps/

Saving Capitalism 

trailer:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8T9E2DBzAaI

[saving capitalism]reich

Robert Reich, the Former Secretary of Labor of the United States, examines America’s fragile democracy and its fight for survival; as income and wealth go to the top, more Americans are left behind. Now it’s up to those ordinary Americans to change the rules. Robert Reich demystifies economics, busting popularized myths told to get people to buy into various policies; while sometimes it seems like an uphill battle, Robert Reich is uniquely trying to find a way to make the system work better for everyone- not just in monetary scales of the bottom line, but in real returns—a better life for everyone.


Cinema Academica hosts film screenings during the academic year at the University of Ottawa on various social, political and economic issues in order to increase social consciousness and encourage activism in the community. All films are completely free of charge. All films are followed by discussion.

For more information:cinemaacademica.ca

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/UOttawa-CinemaAcademica/111045945712456

Parking: There is limited metered parking on campus on Séraphin-Marion (the continuation of Wilbrod west of Cumberland) and in the adjacent lot east of Tabaret Hall, and also on Louis Pasteur, between MacDonald Hall and Gendron Hall. The meters are enforced 24/7. There is also a pay-and-display lot beside Simard Hall. The best bet is on nearby streets in Sandy Hill, e.g., Henderson, where there are signs for 2 or 3 hour parking up to 7:00 p.m., unrestricted after 7:00.

Feb 10 – The Aaron Swartz Story

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

Saturday, February 10, 2018, 7:00 p.m.

Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa. room 339

Map: http://www.uottawa.ca/maps/

The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz is a 2hr long 2014 American biographical documentary film about Aaron Swartz written, directed, and produced by Brian Knappenberger.

The film depicts the life of American computer programmer, writer, political organizer, and Internet activist Aaron Swartz. Footage of Swartz as a child is featured at the start and end of the film. The film is narrated by figures from Swartz’s life, including his mother, brothers, and girlfriends.

Aaron Swartz was  a digital pioneer, using internet and computer and tech savvy in activism to very powerful effect.  He believed the public needed and deserved access to good information as a right and to support a healthy society, and found a quasi-legal method to download vast amounts of research studies and papers to make them free and accessible on the web.  He was given an unconscionably long sentence for doing this, some say to make an example out of him, and it was reported that he committed suicide before he did his sentence.  Some say that his example of how powerful individual people could be to change the system by innovating positive technologies put up red flags for the wrong people, who made sure he got dealt with, and they have tried to put genie back in the bottle.  But his story lives on, a story of tragedy, but also of hope, and the generosity of time, love, and spirit to try to give back something to the world and make a positive difference with the gifts he was given.


Cinema Academica hosts film screenings during the academic year at the University of Ottawa on various social, political and economic issues in order to increase social consciousness and encourage activism in the community. All films are completely free of charge. All films are followed by discussion.

For more information:cinemaacademica.ca

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/UOttawa-CinemaAcademica/111045945712456

Parking: There is limited metered parking on campus on Séraphin-Marion (the continuation of Wilbrod west of Cumberland) and in the adjacent lot east of Tabaret Hall, and also on Louis Pasteur, between MacDonald Hall and Gendron Hall. The meters are enforced 24/7. There is also a pay-and-display lot beside Simard Hall. The best bet is on nearby streets in Sandy Hill, e.g., Henderson, where there are signs for 2 or 3 hour parking up to 7:00 p.m., unrestricted after 7:00.

Eco-villages – Feb 3 2018

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

Saturday, February 3, 2018, 7:00 p.m.

Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa. room 339

Map: http://www.uottawa.ca/maps/

Eco-Village – Eco-City
February 3rd7:00 pm. (Feb. 10th snow date)
Free event hosted by Cinema Academica at Ottawa U.
Lamoureux Hall, room 339
Imagine living a satisfying, healthy life while causing practically no damage to the Earth.  Better still, one can live well and improve the long-term well-being of planet and people.
Lanark Eco-Village aims to show how.
The Feb. 3rd discussion will be an introduction and discussion about Eco-Village living and how the perspective gained on that micro-scale might be applied elsewhere.
Earning a living or Making a living
Earning a living means making money and buying what one needs.  This process tends to separate one from the sources of one’s living.  When one makes a living, one works with soil and trees, tools, knowledge and good-will to produce goods or services for personal use or for trade.  In the process, one creates bonding relationships with the Earth and with other people.
This year Lanark Eco-Village has a number of openings where individuals can enjoy the natural world and learn about soil, growing, harvesting, cooking and preserving food; turning trees into boards, boards into buildings and buildings into a sauna, greenhouse, bath house, food storage and more.  Optional will be sessions on cultural evolution and the shifting of our over-grown, troubled society into one that is mature, healthy, stable and secure.
Facing the large problems of our times, the single most potent thing that you can do to help is to enjoy yourself.  More friends, creativity, learning, sport, service and appreciation and less stuff !  We could enjoying living so much that we wouldn’t have time to consume at a dangerous level.
Hope you can join us in discussing this on Feb. 3rd.

Cinema Academica hosts film screenings during the academic year at the University of Ottawa on various social, political and economic issues in order to increase social consciousness and encourage activism in the community. All films are completely free of charge. All films are followed by discussion.

For more information:cinemaacademica.ca

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/UOttawa-CinemaAcademica/111045945712456

Parking: There is limited metered parking on campus on Séraphin-Marion (the continuation of Wilbrod west of Cumberland) and in the adjacent lot east of Tabaret Hall, and also on Louis Pasteur, between MacDonald Hall and Gendron Hall. The meters are enforced 24/7. There is also a pay-and-display lot beside Simard Hall. The best bet is on nearby streets in Sandy Hill, e.g., Henderson, where there are signs for 2 or 3 hour parking up to 7:00 p.m., unrestricted after 7:00.

Oliver Stones’ Ukraine On Fire – Jan 27, 2018

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

This week at Cinema Academica:

Saturday, January 27, 2018, 7:00 p.m.

Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa. room 339

Map: http://www.uottawa.ca/maps/

Ukraine on Fire
Ukraine’s 2014 Maidan Massacre helped oust President Yanukovych with Russia painted as the perpetrator. Oliver Stone interviews Russian President Vladimir PutinYanukovych and others, exposing the role the U.S. played in destabilizing the region.

Cinema Academica hosts film screenings during the academic year at the University of Ottawa on various social, political and economic issues in order to increase social consciousness and encourage activism in the community. All films are completely free of charge. All films are followed by discussion.

For more information:cinemaacademica.ca

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/UOttawa-CinemaAcademica/111045945712456

Parking: There is limited metered parking on campus on Séraphin-Marion (the continuation of Wilbrod west of Cumberland) and in the adjacent lot east of Tabaret Hall, and also on Louis Pasteur, between MacDonald Hall and Gendron Hall. The meters are enforced 24/7. There is also a pay-and-display lot beside Simard Hall. The best bet is on nearby streets in Sandy Hill, e.g., Henderson, where there are signs for 2 or 3 hour parking up to 7:00 p.m., unrestricted after 7:00.

jan 20th – (watching) an interview with Gene Sharp

 

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA
This week at Cinema Academica:

Saturday, January 20, 2018, 7:00 p.m.

Vanier Hall, University of Ottawa. room 2095

Please note change of location for this week only!
Map: www.uottawa.ca/maps/

(from the video we will be watching):
Many protest movements around the world have been influenced by an 83-year-old political scientist, Dr Gene Sharp and his book From Dictatorship to Democracy. We are thrilled to announce that Dr Gene Sharp will be joining us at the Frontline Club in conversation with Ruaridh Arrow, journalist, filmmaker and director of the award winning documentary How to Start a Revolution to discuss the uprisings across the Middle East and North Africa and his work. From the ground floor of his home in Boston the 83-year-old runs the Albert Einstein Institution which is devoted to the study and promotion of the use of nonviolent resistance worldwide.

The 198 “non-violent weapons” listed in his book range from the use of colours and symbols, writing large banners in English to mock funerals and boycotts. First written in 1993 to support the opposition movement in Burma, Sharp’s work has now been circulated amongst dissidents around the world.

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