Category Archives: Uncategorized

Cinema Academica Fall 2017 Schedule Oct 14 – Dec 2nd

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

This week at Cinema Academica

Saturday, October 14, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa, room 339

Map: http://www.uottawa.ca/maps/

Empire Files: Privacy, Control, & the Darknet

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Asu3_ataA1M

Out of the periphery of most online users, there’s a vast, hidden space used by people who want to remain anonymous, which filmmaker Alex Winter explores in his documentary Deep Web. The film focuses on the Silk Road, a black market hosted on the Darknet using bitcoin cryptocurrency, and the trial of Ross Ulbricht, who was given a double life sentence without the possibility of parole for creating and hosting the site. Abby Martin and Alex Winter discuss more about the Deep Web, the Drug War, and why encryption on things like signal still matter in light of the Wikileaks’ Vault 7 release.


Upcoming at Cinema Academica (tentative listing):

Saturday, October 21, 2017, 7:00 p.m.
Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa, room 339

Empire files: The Rise of history’s greatest empire

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gs4PxkVUxKs

Abby Martin debuts teleSUR’s The Empire Files exploring the U.S. Empire, its rise to world hegemony and its impact on people and the planet.

Saturday, October 28, 2017
Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa, room 339
Empire files: Propaganda & Engineering Consent for Empire with Mark Crispin Miller
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F7HmFH-Wo1s

With thousands of advertisements seen by Americans everyday, and a corporate media that reinforces the needs of Empire, propaganda in the U.S. is more pervasive and effective than ever before. The manipulation of public opinion through suggestion can be traced back to the father of modern propaganda, Edward Bernays, who discovered that preying on the subconscious mind was the best way to sell products people don’t need, and wars people don’t want. To get a deeper understanding of how propaganda functions in today’s society, Abby Martin interviews Dr. Mark Crispin Miller, professor of Media Studies at New York University.

Saturday, November 4, 2017, 7:00 p.m.
Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa. room 339

Empire Files: Bush Military Official: The Empire’s Ship is Sinking
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zOagQ_nfCes

Abby Martin interviews retired U.S. Army Colonel Lawrence Wilkerson, former national security advisor to the Reagan administration, who spent years as an assistant to Secretary of State Colin Powell during both Bush administrations. Today, he is honest about the unfixable corruption inside the establishment and the corporate interests driving foreign policy. Hear a rare insider’s view of what interests are behind U.S. wars, the manipulation of intelligence, the intertwining of the military and corporate world, and why the U.S. Empire is doomed.

Saturday, November 11, 2017, 7:00 p.m.
Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa. room 339

Why we fight

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BcuStxJHv4c

Why We Fight won the Grand Jury Prize at the 2005 Sundance Film Festival. It is an unflinching look at the anatomy of the American war machine, weaving unforgettable personal stories with commentary by a “who’s who” of military and Washington beltway insiders. Featuring John McCain, Gore Vidal, William Kristol, Chalmers Johnson, Richard Perle and others, Why We Fight launches a bipartisan inquiry into the workings of the military industrial complex and the rise of the American Empire.

Saturday,  November 18, 2017, 7:00 p.m.
Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa. room 339

Michael Moore’s ‘Sicko’

trailer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ffVJshHn-1w

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TcyWMgpDOX4

2h3m 2007

Filmmaker Michael Moore examines America’s health-care crisis and why millions of citizens are without coverage. Moore spotlights the cases of several ordinary citizens whose lives have been shattered by bureaucratic red tape, refusal of payment, and other health-care catastrophes. He explains how the system has become so problematic, and he visits countries where citizens receive free health care, as in Canada, France and the U.K..
Saturday, November 25, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

Lamoureux Hall, University of Ottawa, room 339
Social Theory of Freedom of Expression

A Cinema Academica talk by

Dr Denis Rancourt

Researcher, Ontario Civil Liberties Association (ocla.ca)

SUMMARY:

If there is one feature of social organization that speaks to our fundamental human nature, then it is our relentless creation, maintenance and growth of dominance hierarchy.

I will describe civil rights and the fundamental human right of freedom of expression as necessary maintenance and self-repair mechanisms for any large dominance hierarchy (civilization, nation, corporation…) to thrive rather than suffer partial or total collapse.

In this picture, all laws are evolving codes to organize, stabilize and enforce a growing and complexifying dominance hierarchy. Predictably, the codes themselves are often “hacked” by upper-strata groups that are overly ambitious in seeking additional relative advantages. This produces “pathological” laws that destabilize the overall hierarchy.

I will argue that present anti-speech laws (internet censorship, correctness codes, civil defamation, secrecy laws, criminal hate speech) are such pathological laws, the degree of application of which is a measure of the degree of totalitarianism in the society.

Saturday, December 2, 2017, 7:00 p.m.
Peter Joseph’s Culture in Decline, episode 1: “What Democracy?” (2012)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTbLslkIR2k

This opening show addresses the (at the time) coming 2012 US Presidential Election and the subject of what we perceive as “Democracy” in the world today. It includes a good explanation of what ‘cognitive dissonance’ is, and how it serves to keep people ignorant and helpless to respond to crises we face today.

This will be our last showing for fall 2017. The series resumes January 13, 2018.

The Rest of Cinema Academica with Peace Fest for Sept 2017

The full list of Ottawa Peace Festival 2017 events can be found here:
ottawapeacefestival.blogspot.com/

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA


No Cinema Academica movie Saturday Sept 23, 2017


Saturday, Sept 30, 2017, 7:00pm
Montpetit Hall, University of Ottawa campus, room 201

Under the Same Sun

“Under the Same Sun” is a brave mockumentary parable that imagines the dramatic consequences of an unlikely business partnership between an Israeli and a Palestinian, and shows that idealism could be a catalyst for change in the war-torn region.

https://vimeo.com/ondemand/underthesamesun
1h15m

Cinema Academica returns in September with Peace Fest

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

This week at Cinema Academica:

Origins: Our roots. Our planet. Our future.

Saturday, September 2, 2017, 7:00 p.m.
Montpetit Hall, University of Ottawa campus, room 201

Map: http://www.uottawa.ca/maps/                                 

“Four years, 19 countries, and 24 experts in anthropology, medicine, ecology, and health have exposed the roots of our DNA and how to prevent the modern world from making you sick.”

This is a movie that explores how people in modern times can balance living in a technological world and respecting our biological, cultural, and human needs.

http://origins.well.org/

the trailer:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4bDAWkne8wM


Upcoming at Cinema Academica:

Saturday, September 9, 2017, 7:00 p.m.
Montpetit Hall, University of Ottawa campus, room 201

Rigoberta Menchú: Daughter of the Maya

The story of an unlikely hero, a poor peasant Maya girl living in a remote section of Guatemala, who survived a genocide and became a voice for her people across the world. This film shares the story of this 1984 Nobel Peace Prize winner.


Saturday, September 16, 2017, 6:30 p.m. (Please note earlier start time.)
Montpetit Hall, University of Ottawa campus, room 201
samedi le 16 de Septembre, 18h30

Kanehsatake, 270 ans de résistance

Documentaire sur la confrontation historique qui a propulsé les problèmes des Autochtones de Kanehsatake et du village d’Oka au Québec au premier plan de la scène internationale et de la conscience des Canadiens. Au cours de cet été épuisant de 1990, la productrice et réalisatrice Alanis Obomsawin, elle-même Abénaquise, a passé 78 jours et nuits angoissants derrière les barricades dressées par les Mohawks, à tourner des images du conflit armé les opposant à la Sûreté du Québec et l’Armée canadienne.

https://www.nfb.ca/film/kanehsatake_270_ans_resistance/

(French with English subtitles)
Kanehsatake, 270 years of Resistance

On a hot July day in 1990, an historic confrontation propelled Indigenous issues in Kanehsatake and the village of Oka, Québec, into the international spotlight and into the Canadian conscience. Director Alanis Obomsawin endured 78 nerve-wracking days and nights filming the armed stand-off between the Mohawks, the Québec police and the Canadian army. A powerful feature-documentary emerges that takes you right into the action of an age-old Indigenous struggle. The result is a portrait of the people behind the barricades, providing insight into the Mohawks’ unyelding determination to protect their land.

https://www.nfb.ca/film/kanehsatake_270_years_of_resistance/


No Cinema Academica movie Saturday Sept 23, 2017

 


Saturday, Sept 30, 2017, 7:00pm
Montpetit Hall, University of Ottawa campus, room 201

Under the Same Sun

“Under the Same Sun” is a brave mockumentary parable that imagines the dramatic consequences of an unlikely business partnership between an Israeli and a Palestinian, and shows that idealism could be a catalyst for change in the war-torn region.

https://vimeo.com/ondemand/underthesamesun
1h15m

 

 

 

Apr 8th 2017 – Hasan Diab documentary and talk with supporters – Final Cinema Academica of the season

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

This week at Cinema Academica:

Lamoureux Hall (145 JJ Lussier), University of Ottawa, room 339

Map: http://www.uottawa.ca/maps/

Saturday, April 8, 2017

(Short) Film showing “Rubber stamped,” the Hassan Diab Story.

Hassan Diab, a sociology professor at Carleton University, was arrested in 2008 in connection with the deadly bombing of a Paris synagogue that occurred 28 years prior in 1980.

The Canadian judge who extradited Hassan Diab described the French case as “weak” and concluded that a conviction was unlikely if tried in a Canadian court.
Under the flawed extradition law however, the judge felt he had no other option but send Hassan to France.
France’s new anti-terrorism laws permit courts to rely on secret “intelligence,” whose contents or sources have never been disclosed to Mr. Diab.
After 6 years of imprisonment and house arrest in Canada, Mr. Diab was extradited to France in 2014.

Because of France’s documented history of using torture evidence in anti-terrorism investigations and trials, human rights and civil liberties groups opposed the unconditional extradition given concerns that if delivered to France, Dr. Diab–a Canadian citizen–may face trial based on evidence potentially derived from torture.

Since his jailing, French investigative judges recommended that he be released on bail, saying there was reliable evidence that he was not in Paris at the time of the bombing.  An appeal panel over-turned these recommendations saying that Diab’s release would be a ”threat” to “public order”.
Hassan’s Canadian lawyer Don Bayne, said Mr. Diab, a Muslim Canadian in Lebanon, is Canada’s Alfred Dreyfus, a French Jew wrongly accused during a strongly anti-Semitic time.

It has now been more than two years that Mr. Diab has been held in pre-trial detention in France. We are calling on the Government of Canada to raise Mr. Diab’s case with the French authorities. We have the gravest concern that this case represents a profound miscarriage of justice and the time to act is long overdue.

For more info:
Justice for Hassan Diab website: www.justiceforhassandiab.org
Please sign and share our e-petition to the Government of Canada in support of Dr. Hassan Diab:

https://petitions.parl.gc.ca/en/Petition/Details?Petition=e-833

If you are a Canadian citizen or resident of Canada, please sign the e-petition as this would send a strong message that Canadians care and want their government to act.

Only the Clerk of Petitions at Parliament would have access to your information. Your personal information will not be made public.

Please share this announcement widely and help us get the Canadian government to intervene to put an end to the plight of Hassan and his family!

Friends of Hassan Diab Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/friendsofhassandiab/

The film will be followed by a PANEL DISCUSSION

Ask  questions about Hassan Diab’s current detention in France and  the failure of Canada’s justice system and extradition law to protect him.
Some parallels can be drawn with the infamous Dreyfus case (1894).

Learn about  the roadblocks to Hassan’s freedom and return to his family in Canada.

Offer ideas about what you can do to help.

Panel:  (all members of the Hassan Diab Support Committee)

Jo Wood,  Human Rights Activist and former professor at Carleton U.

Colin Stuart, Human Rights Activists and former professor at Carleton U.

Roger Clark, Human Rights Activist and former Director of Amnesty International – Canada


Cinema Academica an independent student film club hosting film screenings during the academic year at the University of Ottawa on various social, political and economic issues in order to increase social consciousness and encourage activism in the community. All films are completely free of charge. All films are followed by discussion.

For more information:

cinemaacademica.ca

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/UOttawa-CinemaAcademica/111045945712456

Parking: There is limited metered parking on campus on Séraphin-Marion (the continuation of Wilbrod west of Cumberland) and in the adjacent lot east of Tabaret Hall, and also on Louis Pasteur, between MacDonald Hall and Gendron Hall. The meters are enforced 24/7. There is also a pay-and-display lot beside Simard Hall. The best bet is on nearby streets in Sandy Hill, e.g., Henderson, where there are signs for 2 or 3 hour parking up to 7:00 p.m., unrestricted after 7:00.

April 1st Mystery Showing

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

This week at Cinema Academica:
Saturday, April 1, 2017, 7:00 p.m.
Saturday April 1st  will be a surprise theme and discussion.
Lamoureux Hall (145 JJ Lussier), University of Ottawa, room 339


Cinema Academica an independent student film club hosting film screenings during the academic year at the University of Ottawa on various social, political and economic issues in order to increase social consciousness and encourage activism in the community. All films are completely free of charge. All films are followed by discussion.

For more information:

cinemaacademica.ca

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/UOttawa-Cinema-Academica/111045945712456

Parking: There is limited metered parking on campus on Séraphin-Marion (the continuation of Wilbrod west of Cumberland) and in the adjacent lot east of Tabaret Hall, and also on Louis Pasteur, between MacDonald Hall and Gendron Hall. The meters are enforced 24/7. There is also a pay-and-display lot beside Simard Hall. The best bet is on nearby streets in Sandy Hill, e.g., Henderson, where there are signs for 2 or 3 hour parking up to 7:00 p.m., unrestricted after 7:00.

Upcoming Cinema Academica Showings- mar 25, Apr 1, Apr 8 2017

 

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

This week at Cinema Academica:

Saturday, March 25, 2017, 7:00 p.m.
Lamoureux Hall (145 JJ Lussier), University of Ottawa, room 339

Map: http://www.uottawa.ca/maps/

Taken for a ride

Join us with host Lazar Ilic for the Cinema Academica showing of “Taken for a Ride,” the film that exposed the auto and oil industry campaign to destroy public transit, and its devastating impact on American Cities.  55min

Upcoming at Cinema Academica:

Saturday, April 1, 2017, 7:00 p.m.
Saturday April 1st  will be a surprise theme and discussion.
Lamoureux Hall (145 JJ Lussier), University of Ottawa, room 339

Saturday, April 8, 2017

(Short) Film showing “Rubber stamped,” the Hassan Diab Story.
Lamoureux Hall (145 JJ Lussier), University of Ottawa, room 339

Hassan Diab, a sociology professor at Carleton University, was arrested in 2008 in connection with the deadly bombing of a Paris synagogue that occurred 28 years prior in 1980.

The Canadian judge who extradited Hassan Diab described the French case as “weak” and concluded that a conviction was unlikely if tried in a Canadian court.

Under the flawed extradition law however, the judge felt he had no other option but send Hassan to France.

France’s new anti-terrorism laws permit courts to rely on secret “intelligence,” whose contents or sources have never been disclosed to Mr. Diab.
After 6 years of imprisonment and house arrest in Canada, Mr. Diab was extradited to France in 2014.

Because of France’s documented history of using torture evidence in anti-terrorism investigations and trials, human rights and civil liberties groups opposed the unconditional extradition given concerns that if delivered to France, Dr. Diab–a Canadian citizen–may face trial based on evidence potentially derived from torture.

Since his jailing, French investigative judges recommended that he be released on bail, saying there was reliable evidence that he was not in Paris at the time of the bombing.  An appeal panel over-turned these recommendations saying that Diab’s release would be a ” threat” to “public order”.

Hassan’s Canadian lawyer Don Bayne, said Mr. Diab, a Muslim Canadian in Lebanon, is Canada’s Alfred Dreyfus, a French Jew wrongly accused during a strongly anti-Semitic time.

It has now been more than two years that Mr. Diab has been held in pre-trial detention in France. We are calling on the Government of Canada to raise Mr. Diab’s case with the French authorities. We have the gravest concern that this case represents a profound miscarriage of justice and the time to act is long overdue.

For more info:
Justice for Hassan Diab website: www.justiceforhassandiab.org

Friends of Hassan Diab Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/friendsofhassandiab/

This will be followed by a PANEL DISCUSSION

Ask  questions about Hassan Diab’s current detention in France and  the failure of Canada’s justice extradition law to protect him.
Some parallels can be drawn with the infamous Dreyfus case (1894).

Learn about  the roadblocks to Hassan’s freedom and return to his family in Canada.

Offer ideas about what you can do to help.

Panel:  (all members of the Hassan Diab Support Committee)

Jo Wood,  Human Rights Activist and former professor at Carleton U.

Colin Stuart, Human Rights Activists and former professor at Carleton U.

Roger Clark, Human Rights Activist and former Director of Amnesty International – Canada


Cinema Academica an independent student film club hosting film screenings during the academic year at the University of Ottawa on various social, political and economic issues in order to increase social consciousness and encourage activism in the community. All films are completely free of charge. All films are followed by discussion.

For more information:

cinemaacademica.ca

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/UOttawa-Cinema-Academica/111045945712456

Parking: There is limited metered parking on campus on Séraphin-Marion (the continuation of Wilbrod west of Cumberland) and in the adjacent lot east of Tabaret Hall, and also on Louis Pasteur, between MacDonald Hall and Gendron Hall. The meters are enforced 24/7. There is also a pay-and-display lot beside Simard Hall. The best bet is on nearby streets in Sandy Hill, e.g., Henderson, where there are signs for 2 or 3 hour parking up to 7:00 p.m., unrestricted after 7:00.

 

 

 

 

Sat Mar 18, 7pm – Requiem for the American Dream

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

This week at Cinema Academica:

Requiem for the American Dream

Saturday, March 18, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

Lamoureux Hall (145 JJ Lussier), University of Ottawa, room 339

Map: http://www.uottawa.ca/maps/

Requiem for the American Dream” offers a crisp encapsulation of Noam Chomsky’s thoughts on where corporate political influence and expanding economic equality are taking our nation as a whole — in a handbasket or otherwise. Needless to say, the diagnosis is not good, if not quite terminal yet, either.


“… he[Noam] outlines the “Ten Principals of Concentration of Wealth and Power” that have created rapidly growing income inequality and myriad related problems in the U.S. today… a damning case against entrenched forces among the nation’s economic elite as having deliberately sowed a “vicious cycle” that increases wealth at the top while shrinking opportunity for everyone else…

His 10 principles include reducing broad democratic participation in governance; shifting the nation’s economic base from manufacture (which employs/benefits all) to the finance games of stock market and credit; shifting the tax burden to relieve the well-off; deregulation; election engineering (crowned by Citizens United, the masterstroke in empowering corporate influence on and within government); eroding the power of organized labor; promoting the mass distraction of frivolous consumerism; and “marginalizing the population” by splitting them into impotent factions angry at each other (rather than those at the top).”
(from the review by Dennis Harvey in Variety)

Cinema Academica an independent student film club hosting film screenings during the academic year at the University of Ottawa on various social, political and economic issues in order to increase social consciousness and encourage activism in the community. All films are completely free of charge. All films are followed by discussion.

For more information:

cinemaacademica.ca

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/UOttawa-CinemaAcademica/111045945712456

Parking: There is limited metered parking on campus on Séraphin-Marion (the continuation of Wilbrod west of Cumberland) and in the adjacent lot east of Tabaret Hall, and also on Louis Pasteur, between MacDonald Hall and Gendron Hall. The meters are enforced 24/7. There is also a pay-and-display lot beside Simard Hall. The best bet is on nearby streets in Sandy Hill, e.g., Henderson, where there are signs for 2 or 3 hour parking up to 7:00 p.m., unrestricted after 7:00.

Sat. Mar 11th – We Are Wisconsin showing at Cinema Academica

CINEMA ACADEMICA
FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

This week at Cinema Academica:

We are Wisconsin

Saturday, March 11, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

Lamoureux Hall (145 JJ Lussier), University of Ottawa, room 339

Map: http://www.uottawa.ca/maps/

We are Wisconsin 1h45m
When a Republican Governor’s bill threatens to wipe away worker rights and lock out public debate, six (extra)ordinary citizens force their way into the Wisconsin State Capitol, joining thousands of protesters who spend the next twenty-six days launching a popular uprising that not only challenges the bill, but the soul of a nation.Please excuse the late notification.

 

Cinema Academica an independent student film club hosting film screenings during the academic year at the University of Ottawa on various social, political and economic issues in order to increase social consciousness and encourage activism in the community. All films are completely free of charge. All films are followed by discussion.

For more information:

cinemaacademica.ca

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/UOttawa-Cinema-Academica/111045945712456

Parking: There is limited metered parking on campus on Séraphin-Marion (the continuation of Wilbrod west of Cumberland) and in the adjacent lot east of Tabaret Hall, and also on Louis Pasteur, between MacDonald Hall and Gendron Hall. The meters are enforced 24/7. There is also a pay-and-display lot beside Simard Hall. The best bet is on nearby streets in Sandy Hill, e.g., Henderson, where there are signs for 2 or 3 hour parking up to 7:00 p.m., unrestricted after 7:00.

RESCHEDULED! tonight’s show TBD Sat March 4 – Requiem for the American Dream at Cinema Academica

 

 

 

Unfortunately the Movie Requiem for the American Dream is unavailable for screening this evening. We will try to reschedule this film for a later date this month. Meanwhile, tonight we will have a new show to be determined. We regret any inconvenience this may cause.

 

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

This week at Cinema Academica:

Saturday, March 4, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

Lamoureux Hall (145 JJ Lussier), University of Ottawa, room 339

Map: http://www.uottawa.ca/maps/

Requiem for the American Dream is about, according to Dennis Harvey, in Variety :
( http://variety.com/2016/film/reviews/requiem-for-the-american-dream-review-1201740392/ )

“…[Noam] he outlines the “Ten Principals of Concentration of Wealth and Power” that have created rapidly growing income inequality and myriad related problems in the U.S. today… a damning case against entrenched forces among the nation’s economic elite as having deliberately sowed a “vicious cycle” that increases wealth at the top while shrinking opportunity for everyone else…

His 10 principles include reducing broad democratic participation in governance; shifting the nation’s economic base from manufacture (which employs/benefits all) to the finance games of stock market and credit; shifting the tax burden to relieve the well-off; deregulation; election engineering (crowned by Citizens United, the masterstroke in empowering corporate influence on and within government); eroding the power of organized labor; promoting the mass distraction of frivolous consumerism; and “marginalizing the population” by splitting them into impotent factions angry at each other (rather than those at the top). ”

Cinema Academica an independent student film club hosting film screenings during the academic year at the University of Ottawa on various social, political and economic issues in order to increase social consciousness and encourage activism in the community. All films are completely free of charge. All films are followed by discussion.

For more information:

cinemaacademica.ca

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/UOttawa-CinemaAcademica/111045945712456

Parking: There is limited metered parking on campus on Séraphin-Marion (the continuation of Wilbrod west of Cumberland) and in the adjacent lot east of Tabaret Hall, and also on Louis Pasteur, between MacDonald Hall and Gendron Hall. The meters are enforced 24/7. There is also a pay-and-display lot beside Simard Hall. The best bet is on nearby streets in Sandy Hill, e.g., Henderson, where there are signs for 2 or 3 hour parking up to 7:00 p.m., unrestricted after 7:00.

 

Sat Feb 25, Cinema Academica presents: The Real Syria

 

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

This week at Cinema Academica:

Saturday, February 25, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

Lamoureux Hall (145 JJ Lussier), University of Ottawa, room 339

Map: http://www.uottawa.ca/maps/

This week we will be talking about ‘what is really going on in Syria,’ with some critiques of different media representations of what is going on politically vs the story the media is telling us. Here is a link to one of the clips we will be viewing:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bUyJV6YaSWY

Cinema Academica an independent student film club hosting film screenings during the academic year at the University of Ottawa on various social, political and economic issues in order to increase social consciousness and encourage activism in the community. All films are completely free of charge. All films are followed by discussion.

For more information:

cinemaacademica.ca

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/UOttawa-CinemaAcademica/111045945712456

Parking: There is limited metered parking on campus on Séraphin-Marion (the continuation of Wilbrod west of Cumberland) and in the adjacent lot east of Tabaret Hall, and also on Louis Pasteur, between MacDonald Hall and Gendron Hall. The meters are enforced 24/7. There is also a pay-and-display lot beside Simard Hall. The best bet is on nearby streets in Sandy Hill, e.g., Henderson, where there are signs for 2 or 3 hour parking up to 7:00 p.m., unrestricted after 7:00.