Sat Feb 25, Cinema Academica presents: The Real Syria

 

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

This week at Cinema Academica:

Saturday, February 25, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

Lamoureux Hall (145 JJ Lussier), University of Ottawa, room 339

Map: http://www.uottawa.ca/maps/

This week we will be talking about ‘what is really going on in Syria,’ with some critiques of different media representations of what is going on politically vs the story the media is telling us. Here is a link to one of the clips we will be viewing:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bUyJV6YaSWY

Cinema Academica an independent student film club hosting film screenings during the academic year at the University of Ottawa on various social, political and economic issues in order to increase social consciousness and encourage activism in the community. All films are completely free of charge. All films are followed by discussion.

For more information:

cinemaacademica.ca

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/UOttawa-CinemaAcademica/111045945712456

Parking: There is limited metered parking on campus on Séraphin-Marion (the continuation of Wilbrod west of Cumberland) and in the adjacent lot east of Tabaret Hall, and also on Louis Pasteur, between MacDonald Hall and Gendron Hall. The meters are enforced 24/7. There is also a pay-and-display lot beside Simard Hall. The best bet is on nearby streets in Sandy Hill, e.g., Henderson, where there are signs for 2 or 3 hour parking up to 7:00 p.m., unrestricted after 7:00.

 

 

 

Cinema Academica showing: “Freedom Riders”, Sat Feb 18th

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

This week at Cinema Academica:

Saturday, February 18, 2017 7:00 p.m.
Lamoureux Hall (145 JJ Lussier), University of Ottawa, room 339

Map: http://www.uottawa.ca/maps/

Saturday, February 18th we will be continuing with the Black History month theme with the historical drama “Freedom Riders,” about interracial groups who challenged racial segregation in the American South by using civil disobedience, sitting on buses where they were not allowed.

Next Week at Cinema Academica:

February 25th we will be changing gears, and talking about ‘what is really going on in Syria,’ with some critiques of different media representations of what is going on politically vs the story the media is telling us.

Cinema Academica an independent student film club hosting film screenings during the academic year at the University of Ottawa on various social, political and economic issues in order to increase social consciousness and encourage activism in the community. All films are completely free of charge. All films are followed by discussion.

For more information:

cinemaacademica.ca

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/UOttawa-Cinema-Academica/111045945712456

Parking: There is limited metered parking on campus on Séraphin-Marion (the continuation of Wilbrod west of Cumberland) and in the adjacent lot east of Tabaret Hall, and also on Louis Pasteur, between MacDonald Hall and Gendron Hall. The meters are enforced 24/7. There is also a pay-and-display lot beside Simard Hall. The best bet is on nearby streets in Sandy Hill, e.g., Henderson, where there are signs for 2 or 3 hour parking up to 7:00 p.m., unrestricted after 7:00.

Cinema Academica Sat Feb 11 – Selma

 

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

This week at Cinema Academica:

Selma
128 minutes

Saturday, February 11, 2017 7:00 p.m.
Lamoureux Hall (145 JJ Lussier), University of Ottawa, room 339
Map: http://www.uottawa.ca/maps/
Selma is a 2014 British-American historical drama film directed by Ava DuVernay and written by Paul Webb. It is based on the 1965 Selma to Montgomery voting rights marches led by James Bevel, Hosea Williams, Martin Luther King, Jr. and John Lewis. Learn about the fight for right for Blacks with us this Black History Month at Cinema Academica.

Cinema Academica an independent student film club hosting film screenings during the academic year at the University of Ottawa on various social, political and economic issues in order to increase social consciousness and encourage activism in the community. All films are completely free of charge. All films are followed by discussion.

For more information:

cinemaacademica.ca

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/UOttawa-Cinema-Academica/111045945712456Parking: There is limited metered parking on campus on Séraphin-Marion (the continuation of Wilbrod west of Cumberland) and in the adjacent lot east of Tabaret Hall, and also on Louis Pasteur, between MacDonald Hall and Gendron Hall. The meters are enforced 24/7. There is also a pay-and-display lot beside Simard Hall. The best bet is on nearby streets in Sandy Hill, e.g., Henderson, where there are signs for 2 or 3 hour parking up to 7:00 p.m., unrestricted after 7:00.

 

 

 

CA Sat Jan 28 – Solutions to the world economic crisis

CINEMA ACADEMICA

FREE FILM AND DISCUSSION SERIES
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

This week at Cinema Academica:

Saturday, January 28, 7:00 p.m.
Lamoureux Hall (145 JJ Lussier), University of Ottawa, room 339

Map: http://www.uottawa.ca/maps/
Michael Goguen will animate a film clip mashup on Solutions to the economic crisis. These clips will provide a lot of context and insight as to where we are right now as a culture, particularly in relation to some of the economic situation the world is experiencing. These are primarily focused on solutions.

Solutions
Sacred Economics by Charles Eisenstein 12min
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EEZkQv25uEs

David Holmgren explains how YOU can change the world with permaculture 6min
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TVS45dbNL-E

Prof Wolff explains what is wrong with capitalism, and where do we go from here (35min)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6P97r9Ci5Kg

This is merely a suggested jumping off point, but the hope is to have an interactive discussion between every clip.


Cinema Academica an independent student film club hosting film screenings during the academic year at the University of Ottawa on various social, political and economic issues in order to increase social consciousness and encourage activism in the community. All films are completely free of charge. All films are followed by discussion.

For more information
cinemaacademica.ca
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/UOttawa-CinemaAcademica/111045945712456

Parking: There is limited metered parking on campus on Séraphin-Marion (the continuation of Wilbrod west of Cumberland) and in the adjacent lot east of Tabaret Hall, and also on Louis Pasteur, between MacDonald Hall and Gendron Hall. The meters are enforced 24/7. There is also a pay-and-display lot beside Simard Hall. The best bet is on nearby streets in Sandy Hill, e.g., Henderson, where there are signs for 2 or 3 hour parking up to 7:00 p.m., unrestricted after 7:00.

The Zibi Development and Indigenous Consent: Contestation and Protest

By Joey Clavette

This was originally published in The Leveller

On June 17 a group of over 300 protesters marched from Victoria Island to Parliament Hill. The protest was organized by Algonquin Elders under the slogan “It Is Sacred,” referring to the Albert and Chaudière Islands, which have been sold to Windmill and Dream Unlimited Corp. in order to build the Zibi development project consisting of condominiums and commercial spaces.

Picket signs read: “Trudeau aidez nous (Trudeau help us),” “Nothing is Greener than Trees,” “Solidarity with Algonquins,” and “Amazon tribes support Grandfather William Commanda’s Spiritual Centre. Declare the centre sacred now.”

The project has been shrouded in controversy since the city rezoned the land and sold it to Windmill on Oct. 8, 2014. The controversy focuses on the claim that the Chaudière Islands are sacred Algonquin territory that have been sold to a private company without the consent of the Algonquin people.

Many of the protesters were in support of Grandfather William Commanda’s vision for the Chaudière site as an alternative to the Windmill developments. Commanda was an elder from Kitigan Zibi who passed away in 2011 yet remains an important figure. His vision was for a peace and healing centre to be built on Victoria Island and for Albert and Chaudière to be reverted to park land.

Continue reading The Zibi Development and Indigenous Consent: Contestation and Protest

Africa and the Single Story

By Joey Clavette

Earlier this semester we screened “Concerning Violence“. I wrote a little something about it here. But before the film I had also given a presentation on Africa which attempted to dispel a lot of myths about it. While this film which is set in Africa is about violence, it is imperative to know that Africa is much more than a land of violence. In an African history course I took I was made to sit down and actually write about this subject so I thought I’d share it here:

Kigali, Rwanda today

The word Africa comes from the Latin word Afri. Originally the name was meant to describe one tribe which the Romans had known from Libya. The term then came to be used to describe the entire expansive and diverse continent. This is an illustrative example from ancient Western culture to show how simplistic the Western view of Africa has been for a very long time.

In his work The Invention of Africa, philosopher V.Y. Mudimbe points out that African unity was not a concept on the continent before European contact. Blackness and Africanness are descriptions of an “Other”; as something different in such a way from Europeanness. Africans are described altogether by their relative difference to Europeans rather than their own characteristics. This results in a vast homogenization of Africans in the Western psyche, and we can clearly see that present today in what Chimamanda Adichie calls the ‘Single Story of Africa’.

One might hear a friend say “I’d like to go to Africa”, and when asked “where in Africa?” they might respond with dismay… “just Africa”. Africa to many people is thought of as a vast, wild (yet relative homogenous) landscape full of violent conflicts, diseases, poverty, safari animals and “black” people. This is how Africa is portrayed in popular media. This is the single story. The fact that there is more genetic diversity among the natives of Africa than there is among white Europeans is not important, they are simply “black”. The vast size of the African continent, the metropolitan areas, the ecological diversity, the more than 1500 unique languages, the stability, the health and the economic development are all glossed over and replaced with a single story.

Continue reading Africa and the Single Story